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"... the most important considerations in devising educational programs for children with autistic spectrum disorders have to do with recognition of the autism spectrum as a whole, with the concomitant implications for social, communicative, and behavioral development and learning, and with the understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the individual child across areas of development."
—Educating Children with Autism2001

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Subscribe to stay informed of xMinds events, opportunities for advocacy, relevant news articles, and regional programs, lectures, and workshops to help parents and educators improve the educational experiences of students on the autism spectrum.

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"... the most important considerations in devising educational programs for children with autistic spectrum disorders have to do with recognition of the autism spectrum as a whole, with the concomitant implications for social, communicative, and behavioral development and learning, and with the understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the individual child across areas of development."
—Educating Children with Autism2001




Understanding Autism
Understanding Social Communication Differences

Empathy
Empathy is the ability to understand that others have beliefs, desires, and intentions that are different from one’s own. Students on the autism spectrum lack this ability and it has a profound effect on their behavior and interactions with others. Teaching empathy is a slow process that requires consistent direct instruction, both before and during social interactions. It’s helpful to provide a variety of ways of teaching this pivotal skill.

  • May have difficulty understanding that others have beliefs, desires, and intentions that are different from his own
  • May assume that everyone shares his perspective
  • May assume others share her ideas
  • May consider only his own ideas when playing a game
  • May not understand how or why it’s important to reciprocate during play, preferring to play alone or dictate play to others
  • May not understand the importance of compromising
  • May not respond appropriately to compliments or give compliments to others
  • May not seek comfort from others or give comfort to others
  • May lack tact in expressing opinions; may sound rude or mean-spirited
  • May be unaware if she has offended someone
  • May not repair conversations or relationships because he isn’t aware of breakdowns







Improving the educational experiences and outcomes of students on the autism spectrum in grades K-12

 
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